Wednesday, 21 January 2009

Scrapbook-style Island Travelogue









PLEASE DOUBLE-CLICK ON EACH OF THE IMAGES TO SEE THEM AT FULL-PAGE SIZE. 

AND before you read any further, I apologise for this blog layout - I am struggling with making the template do what I want.  







I will share it nevertheless and hope the poor presentation will not detract from my visual travelogue. (I have now bought a teach-yourself book on HTML and will eventually re-configure this posting.)

I cannot recall exactly when I made the scrapbook-style travel journal shown above and introduced in my last post, but it must have been three or four years ago. It began life at an Embroiderer's Guild workshop, not as a journal but as an exercise whose exact purpose I cannot now recall, nor can I find the notes I made then. All I do remember is that we were asked to bring along a photo that we liked and bits of yarn that matched in colour. Then we had to mess about with different papers, tinting them to match the photo and yarn. The left hand 'Scilly Idyll' page is the sheet I made documenting this exercise, with some of the papers I created and notes on how I mixed the colours I liked. (I think, that if you double-click on any of the pics, they will open full-screen. Certainly the photos I included in the previous post will do that.)

When I arrived back home, I looked at all the photos I had taken on our last visit to the Scillies, and two things struck me: first that we would not be going again due to cost, and second, that whenever I have made practice pieces over the years, I always tend to use the same colours! Rummaging through my samples boxes from numerous day classes, I found lots of little pieces of textiles - machine-embroidery, bits of knitting and so on. So rather than create a wordy travel journal, I decided to use the photos and bits of this and that to create a scrapbook style travelogue.

I made extra embellishmenys in suitable threads, rooted out shells to hang below the papess and found hand-made papers for backgrounds, plus others to frame each spread (two pages facing). I added words - which would have been better on vellum, but at that point in time, I had never heard of modern vellum paper, or of the correct glue, or even tried using bondaweb (wunder-under) as I now do to fix transparent paper. So I used tracing paper for the words and quite the wrong adhesive; it shows as a dark blob behind the text! One day, I will replace all the page photos. Raymond spent all morning taking them for me. First in our north-facing guest bedroom, but the light was too dim, then outside balanced on a music stand in a howling - and cold - north-westerly gale. How many times have we said to each other that we MUST set ourselves up with appropriate equipment to take studio shots. That was a facility we enjoyed when we were still involved with our publishing business; cameras and dark-rooms and all the facilities necessary to produce and print magazines.

I hope you enjoy this first cataloguing of my journaling experiences and endeavours. They will be interspersed with new work as I complete it - but I am very slow, very tentative. Meanwhile, maybe these early attempts will encourage other beginners to have a go.

7 comments:

  1. Gorgeous journal pages. Look like you did some stitching too like on the clam shell. I wish I could make such lovely layered pages.

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  2. Suki, Thankyou so much; your comment means a lot to me. Yes, apart from scrunched paper, I included machine embroidery samples and little bits of knitting or crochet. I rummaged through my residue of past workshops and thought that combining some of my experimentations was a good way to make them visible. Some items were made specially for the journal. Ann

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  3. These are beautiful, both small and in the large window. Thank you for sharing!

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  4. Andi, thankyou for visiting, and for your kind words. I'll check out your blog later, when I have a spare 'sitting-by-the-fire' moment. Ann.

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  5. Wonderful to see your journal. Thank you for posting and sharing.
    ~Sharon
    Houston, Texas

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  6. Thankyou, Sharon - I will be posting (and sharing) more of my journals and journaling experiences by and by; time is of the essence. Ann

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  7. Dear Ann,
    Thanks for visiting my blog and leaving me such a kind comment.
    I have come back to look at your beautiful journals pages again.
    Happy days,
    Joanie

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